How a Multivariable Function Changes with Respect to an Azimuthal Coordinate

For a functions $f(x)$, $g(y)$ and $h(z)$, the chain rule yields $ \frac{\partial f(x)}{\partial \phi} = ( \frac{\partial f}{\partial x} ) ( \frac{\partial x}{\partial \phi} )$. $ \frac{\partial g(y)}{\partial \phi}  = (\frac{\partial g}{\partial y})…

Read more

How a Multivariable Function Changes with Respect to a Polar Coordinate

For a functions $f(x)$, $g(y)$ and $h(z)$, the chain rule yields $ \frac{\partial f(x)}{\partial \theta} = ( \frac{\partial f}{\partial x} ) ( \frac{\partial x}{\partial \theta} )$. $ \frac{\partial g(y)}{\partial \theta}  = (\frac{\partial g}{\partial y})…

Read more

How a Multivariable Function Changes with Respect to a Radial Coordinate

First focus on the Cartesian coordinate $x$, which depends on the spherical coordinates $r,\theta,$ and $\phi$. For a function $f(x)$, the chain rule yields $ \frac{\partial f(x)}{\partial r} = ( \frac{\partial f}{\partial x} )…

Read more

Gradient of a Function

Introduction In this post, I find an expression for the gradient of a function, in terms of spherical coordinates. This is a continuation of previous posts, such as this one. This post has a…

Read more